Home > Disarmament > Nuclear weapons threat not decreasing, study says | AFP, Democracy Now,

Nuclear weapons threat not decreasing, study says | AFP, Democracy Now,

UPDATE: The good news: There are 2,000 fewer nuclear weapons than two years ago. The bad news: The world still possesses about 20,500, enough to blow the planet to pieces many times over. Of these, 19,500 are held by Russia and the United States.

The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, which does invaluable work on peace and disarmament issues, has just released a new count. It isn’t too optimistic about nuclear weapons being made extinct, even with the new treaty between the United States and Russia.

Read more here: U.S. Still Relies on Nuclear Weapons | The Progressive.

PREVIOUSLY:

More than 5,000 nuclear weapons are deployed around the world and nuclear powers continue investing in new weapon systems, making meaningful disarmament in the near future unlikely, a report published Tuesday said.

“More than 5,000 nuclear weapons are deployed and ready for use, including nearly 2,000 that are kept in a high state of alert,” according to a report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

SIPRI’s report said the world’s eight nuclear powers — Britain, China, France, India, Israel, Pakistan, Russia and the US — possess more than 20,500 warheads.

Read more here: AFP: Nuclear weapons threat not decreasing, study says.

A new study is warning highly touted efforts at nuclear disarmament are being canceled out by parallel investments in new nuclear weapons systems. The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute says more than 5,000 nuclear weapons are deployed and ready for use around the world, including 2,000 kept in a state of high alert. The world’s eight nuclear powers—Britain, China, France, India, Israel, Pakistan, Russia and the United States—possess some 20,500 nuclear warheads. Because of new weapons spending, the study warns, “it seems unlikely there will be any real nuclear weapon disarmament within the foreseeable future.”

Read more here: Study: Nuclear Disarmament Steps Balanced Out by New Weapons.

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