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Women and nuclear weapons policy | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

In nuclear war, women would suffer at least as much as men. But women tend to be underrepresented in fields—such as high-level politics, diplomacy, military affairs, and science and technology—that bear on nuclear policy. How might women gain greater influence on nuclear weapons policy? And how might their empowerment affect disarmament and nonproliferation efforts?

by Salma Malik

It’s often suggested that women bring a distinct perspective to policy questions and decision-making processes—but in truth, there is often nothing “feminine” about the perspectives that women bring.

A few years ago, Rose Gottemoeller—now the US undersecretary of state for arms control and international security—appreciatively used the term “women of mass destruction” at an informal meeting with a group of Pakistani women who work in security studies. The group she referred to was young and energetic. These women knew their subject matter and understood the politics that surrounded it. But despite what Gottemoeller’s term might have implied, none of them produced work with a gendered bent.

For more on this story, visit: Women and nuclear weapons policy | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.

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