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How the Iraq War Launched the Modern Era of Political BS | Mother Jones

Donald Rumsfeld, George W. Bush, and Dick Cheney (photo: Cherie A. Thurlby/Wikimedia Commons)

Donald Rumsfeld, George W. Bush, and Dick Cheney (photo: Cherie A. Thurlby/Wikimedia Commons)

Factual divides over whether Iraq had WMD, and whether Saddam was working with Osama, set the stage for today’s battles over reality.

—By Chris Mooney 

That queasy sensation of déjà vu you’re experiencing is understandable. With Iraq back in the news, and Paul Wolfowitz and Bill Kristol on TV sounding off about the situation, there’s every reason to worry that a new wave of misinformation is on the way.

There is no debate that the Iraq War was sold to the American public with a collection of claims that ended up being proved false. Iraq was said to have weapons of mass destruction, but this wasn’t the case. Advocates for the war insinuated that Saddam Hussein was colluding with Al Qaeda and was somehow involved in the 9/11 attacks. That, too, was false.

Yet many Americans (and some of their leaders) still believe this stuff. It’s a tragedy, but it’s also a kind of natural experiment in misinformation, its origins, and its consequences. And since 2003 social scientists, psychologists, and pollsters have been busy examining why false beliefs like these are embraced even in the face of irrefutable evidence—and what impact this sort of disinformation has on American political discourse.

For more on this story, visit: How the Iraq War Launched the Modern Era of Political BS | Mother Jones.

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