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Does Anyone in Syria Fear International Law? | The New Yorker

 The Syrian war has become a conflict in which war crimes carry no consequences for the perpetrators—present or, seemingly, future. Photograph by Zein Al-Rifai / REX / AP

The Syrian war has become a conflict in which war crimes carry no consequences for the perpetrators—present or, seemingly, future. Photograph by Zein Al-Rifai / REX / AP

The horror of Syria’s war is in the millions of pictures that are too gruesome to circulate—charred limbs stacked outside hospital wards, bloated bodies rotting in sniper alleys, a toddler plucked from the rubble without a head. It is in a group of relatives trying to carry the sixty-pound corpse of a man who died of hunger—the boiled grass he’d been living on could no longer sustain him—but struggling under his weight, because they, too, are starving to death. It is in a generation of orphans, of children who never learned to read but can tell you the difference between the sounds of shelling and those of air strikes. It is in the intentional bombing of hospitals and clinics, the targeted assassinations of medical workers, the forced displacements, the chemical-weapons attacks. It is in a death toll so high, and so impossible to verify, that the U.N. stopped counting two years ago.

Read the rest of this story at: Does Anyone in Syria Fear International Law? – The New Yorker

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