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Making our movements work for kids and families | Waging Nonviolence

In the wake of Keith Lamont Scott’s death last month, residents of Charlotte, North Carolina built on their years of organizing against police violence by mobilizing to demand justice and grieve another black man killed by police. As people came together in anger and action, my friend Isabell Moore posted a rather unique message on Facebook directed to her friends participating in the protests.

Graphic created by Taylor Chapman.

Graphic created by Taylor Chapman.

As a white queer activist and mother of a two-and-a-half-year-old in nearby Greensboro, Isabell wanted to know if anyone attending the protests was thinking about child care. This was a Facebook message on the group page for Charlotte’s Standing Up For Racial Justice, or SURJ, chapter. Some of the folks who were on the thread were actually at a planning meeting in Charlotte and able to bring the question to the larger group. The response was positive, and after a few days of feverish work with fellow activists in her area, Isabell found herself preparing to welcome kids of all ages to a downtown Charlotte church’s Sunday school room.

Source: Making our movements work for kids and families

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