Home > Human Rights > How the spirit of the indigenous occupation of Alcatraz lives on, 50 years later | Waging Nonviolence

How the spirit of the indigenous occupation of Alcatraz lives on, 50 years later | Waging Nonviolence

For most people, Alcatraz Island is nothing more than a San Francisco tourist destination — home to the infamous penitentiary and Al Capone’s jail cell. But for Kris Longoria, who prefers to be known by her artist name, UrbanRezLife, Alcatraz Island is home.

From 1969 to 1971, when UrbanRezLife was eight years old, she and her family were among a group of nearly a hundred indigenous activists who occupied the island, protesting treaty violations and boldly demanding sovereignty. Eventually, the occupation was forcibly ended by the U.S. government — but not before awakening the American public, igniting indigenous activism nationwide, and directly affecting federal policy.

Fifty years later, the island is where UrbanRezLife goes to be by herself, reflect and even weep. “Alcatraz is my rez,” she said, shorthand for reservation. “I love Alcatraz with all my heart. It changed all of our lives — you can’t leave that space without taking it with you.”

“The spark that started the fire”

Source: How the spirit of the indigenous occupation of Alcatraz lives on, 50 years later – Waging Nonviolence | Waging Nonviolence

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