Home > Featured > John Lewis on Martin Luther King Jr. and Necessary Trouble | Time

John Lewis on Martin Luther King Jr. and Necessary Trouble | Time

Rep. John Lewis is a member of the U.S. Congress from Georgia, and former chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Jan. 4, 2018

I’ve seen unbelievable changes during the past 50 or 60 years. When people say, “Nothing has changed,” I feel like saying, “Come and walk in my shoes.” I truly believe that if there is faith and hope and determination, we can continue to lay progress and create an American community at peace with ourselves. The next generation will help us get there.

When I was growing up as a child in Alabama, I saw signs all around me–I saw crosses that the Klan had put up, an announcement about a Klan meeting. I saw signs that said White, colored, white men, colored men, white women, colored women. There were places where we couldn’t go. But we brought those signs down. The only place you will see those signs today will be in a book, in a museum or on a video. When I was growing up, the great majority of African Americans could not participate in a democratic process in the South. They could not register to vote. But we changed that. When I first came to Washington to go on the freedom rides in 1961, black people and white people couldn’t be seated together on a Greyhound bus leaving this city. They travel to the South without being beaten, arrested and jailed.

Source: John Lewis on Martin Luther King Jr. and Necessary Trouble | Time

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