Home > Latin America > ‘Born fi dead’: The Caribbean looks at the George Floyd protests and sees itself | Global Voices

‘Born fi dead’: The Caribbean looks at the George Floyd protests and sees itself | Global Voices

As Jamaican reggae pioneer Bob Marley declared in his song “So much things to say”: “Remember that when the rain fall, it don’t fall on one man’s housetop.”

The horrific May 25 killing of George Floyd, one of many African-Americans who have died at the hands of the police, is reverberating strongly throughout the Caribbean, a formerly colonized region still grappling with the legacy of its own history of race-based oppression.

‘This is our cause’

Quite apart from the common Caribbean saying, “When the United States sneezes, the Caribbean catches a cold”, which speaks to the mammoth influence — economic and otherwise — that the country wields over the region, many West Indians have played an active role in the black struggle in the United States, notably pan-Africanist and Jamaican national hero Marcus Garvey; Trinidadian Kwame Ture, a prominent figure in the American civil rights movement; and Malcolm X, whose mother was Grenadian, and whose parents were active in Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA).

Source: ‘Born fi dead’: The Caribbean looks at the George Floyd protests and sees itself · Global Voices

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.