Home > Africa > Silent forests and famine in east Africa | Wangari Maathai, The Guardian

Silent forests and famine in east Africa | Wangari Maathai, The Guardian

This article was written by Nobel peace prize winner Wangari Maathai in September, shortly before her death. It addresses some of the main issues she and the Green Belt Movement were intending to raise at the UN climate summit, which starts in Durban, South Africa

Deforestation in the Usambara Mountains in Lushoto District, Tanga Region, Tanzania.

Deforestation in the Usambara Mountains in Lushoto District, Tanga Region, Tanzania.

… For governments and private enterprise to support Redd+ (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation), and at the same time welcome the planting of exotic trees at the expense of indigenous forests, is a contradiction. This is especially true for countries like Kenya, where indigenous forest cover is less than 2% and mainly remains in watershed areas. Establishing plantations of exotic trees in watershed areas and on private farms is bad environmental, economic, and social policy. In the long run, communities will be without reliable rainfall, rivers, productive soils, and food.

… Governments must demonstrate a commitment to standing forests and the rehabilitation of degraded forests. This can be done only if national laws that encourage continued deforestation and forest degradation are reformed; and if communities are supported to plant appropriate trees. If none of this happens, considerable financial resources will be invested without achieving reductions in poverty and other development gains. As the world can see in the east of Africa, there is no time to waste.

For more on this story, visit: Silent forests and famine in east Africa | Wangari Maathai | Comment is free | The Guardian.

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