Home > Africa > The Peace That Wasn’t: Rwanda 20 Years After the Genocide | Alice Gatebuke

The Peace That Wasn’t: Rwanda 20 Years After the Genocide | Alice Gatebuke

It has been 20 years since the genocide began. The former “rebels” now preside over Rwanda; and the freedom they sought as rebels remains out of reach for the general population. As with the government before them, there is no shortage of exclusionary and discriminatory legislation; independent journalists are jailed, exiled, and if foreign, banned from entering the country. Critics and opposition party members face the same restrictions, sometimes even losing their lives for speaking out. Human rights activists are in constant fear of targeted attacks. Genocide survivors are silenced over compassionate pleas to recognize everyone’s humanity. All of this is in addition to the current Rwandan foreign policy of invasion and proxy reign of terror in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Rwanda’s invasions of DRC in 1996 and 1998, greatly contributed to the towering death toll of 6 million civilians.

Even after 20 years, the horror and terror of the genocide is undeniable. The work for peace, and reconciliation must continue. And the struggle for an equal and just Rwanda is as urgent as ever.

Alice Gatebuke is a Rwandan Genocide and war survivor, Cornell University graduate, and a human rights advocate. She can be reached at alice@aglan.org.

For more on this story, visit: The Peace That Wasn’t: Rwanda 20 Years After the Genocide | Alice Gatebuke.

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