Home > Middle East > Afghan war-related child deaths soar to 923 | The Standard, UN

Afghan war-related child deaths soar to 923 | The Standard, UN

The number of children killed in Afghanistan’s conflict jumped by 25 percent in 2016, according to the United Nations Mission in Afghanistan.
The 2016 Annual Report on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict in Afghanistan, released today, documents an overall 3-percent rise in civilian casualties _ both deaths and injuries _ from the previous year.

The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan attributed the disproportionate spike in child casualties in 2016 mainly to a 66-percent increase in casualties from left-over or discarded munitions. The report states that 923 children in Afghanistan were killed in 2016, a 25-percent increase from the previous year. The number of children injured rose by about 23 percent. Overall it was the highest number of casualties among children ever recorded in a single year by UNAMA.

Source: Afghan war-related child deaths soar to 923 – The Standard

IThe United Nations recorded an alarming 24 percent spike in conflict-related child casualties in Afghanistan and a three percent rise in total civilian casualties in 2016 compared to the year before.

FILE - An Afghan security force personnel keeps watch near his check post in Parun, capital of Nuristan province, Afghanistan.

FILE – An Afghan security force personnel keeps watch near his check post in Parun, capital of Nuristan province, Afghanistan.

The violence caused more than 11,400 civilian casualties, including around 3,500 deaths last year, according to the annual report by the U.N. Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, or UNAMA, released in Kabul Monday.

Report blames Taliban for most civilian deaths

It attributed 61 percent of civilian deaths and injuries to anti-government elements, mainly the Taliban. UNAMA blamed pro-government forces for causing 24 percent of the casualties, saying it reflected a 46 percent increase compared to 2015.

Source: UN: Annual Afghan Child Casualties Rose By 24 Percent

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